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Anubis Gate

Anubis Gate Anubis Gate – Covered In Black

Anubis Gate ist eine dänische Progressive- und Power-Metal-Band aus Aalborg, die im Jahr gegründet wurde. Anubis Gate ist eine dänische Progressive- und Power-Metal-Band aus Aalborg, die im Jahr gegründet wurde. Inhaltsverzeichnis. 1 Geschichte; 2 Stil. Mit Anubis Gate bekommt die sonst im internationalen Vergleich eher unterrepräsentierte dänische Szene Zuwachs. Obwohl erst gegründet, hat man es. Entdecken Sie Veröffentlichungen von Anubis Gate auf Discogs. Kaufen Sie Platten, CDs und mehr von Anubis Gate auf dem Discogs-Marktplatz. Im Prinzip könnte ich zu "Anubis Gate", dem selbstbetitelten Viertalbum dieser Band aus dem dänischen Aalborg, den gleichen Einleitungstext.

Anubis Gate

Covered in Black - Anubis Gate: calvarytv.co: Musik. BIOGRAPHY The Anubis Gate biography - from the early beginning till now. THE OLD DAYS: In Jesper M. Jensen (bass) and Henrik Fevre (guitar, vocals). Anubis Gate ist eine dänische Progressive- und Power-Metal-Band aus Aalborg, die im Jahr gegründet wurde.

The Good : Where do I begin? This is such a clever, epic story. Time travel, body swapping, Dickensian London, Egyptian mythology, Romantic poets, evil wizards and an exploration of fatalism - props to Tim Powers for managing to combine all this into something that wasn't absolute crap.

Good story, good characters, great settings and ideas, and the ending was excellent. The Bad : It's a complicated mess at times which might diminish one's enjoyment.

Plus the book starts in , so I suppose the protagonist had a stupid hairdo. Jan 06, Martine rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , historical-fiction , north-american , pseudo-nineteenth-century , science-fiction.

Ever wonder what it would be like to travel in time and be able to rewrite parts of history? In The Anubis Gates , Brendan Doyle, a professor of nineteenth-century English literature living in California, accidentally gets to try his hand at it when he is invited by a mad scientist to attend a lecture given by Samuel Taylor Coleridge in London.

Needless to say, an accident prevents Doyle from returning to his own time it always does in these books, doesn't it?

What ensues is an off-the-wall tale full of outlandish conspiracies, time travel, Doppelgangers and magic, and yes, a bit of poetry.

The evocation of nineteenth-century England isn't entirely convincing there are some glaring historic and linguistic anachronisms , and the narrative gets a bit predictable at times despite the plot being so insane , but the action is non stop, the story unfolds at a cracking pace and there are enough inventive and amusing links to actual history and literature to make even the harshest critic chuckle.

In short, it's a fun read -- not perfect, but perfectly entertaining, with some interesting ideas to ponder afterwards.

View 1 comment. Time travel, body swapping, Ancient Egyptian blood magic, lycanthropy, mutant beings in the sewers of early 19th C London, and a meeting with Coleridge.

The Powers imagination is on full throttle in this one right from the start, and it's a wild ride through the aforementioned tropes, with Powers jugging a variety of characters, plots, sub-plots and timelines in a riotously entertaining romp.

He keeps everything just Time travel, body swapping, Ancient Egyptian blood magic, lycanthropy, mutant beings in the sewers of early 19th C London, and a meeting with Coleridge.

He keeps everything just on the cusp of falling apart into incoherence, driving set piece after set piece at you until you give in, go with the flow and get carried along by the sheer manic exuberance of the thing.

It's a wonderful feat of imagination, a wonderful bit of writing and, in the Zeisling Press hardcover I've got, a wonderfully presented package all round, with an intro by Ramsey Campbel for good measure.

It's a favorite thing of mine, and one I recommend to everyone who asks what I think they should read. So, go and read it if you haven't.

It's truly magical. Jan 09, Megan Baxter rated it liked it. What a strange book. I mean, really, really strange. It's just such a weird mishmash of science fiction and fantasy and the just plain odd.

We read it in my online SF group, and there's a good question here as to whether it's even science fiction. There's time travel, which would put it under that rubric, but also ancient Egyptian magicians ooh, a new tongue twister!

And the time travel itself, now that I think about it, may not be scientific in nature. There's the suggestion that it might be What a strange book.

There's the suggestion that it might be magical as well. Note: The rest of this review has been withheld due to the changes in Goodreads policy and enforcement.

You can read why I came to this decision here. In the meantime, you can read the entire review at Smorgasbook Such an incredibly cool book!

Oct 29, Sandi rated it really liked it Shelves: fantasy , I never quite knew where the story was going or what was going to happen next.

Tim Powers is one of those writers who packs meaning and significance into every scene. I found myself having to backtrack several times to see if I had missed something.

In the last third of the book, there's so much body switching and name changing that I had trouble telling who was who.

I really liked the challenge though, it kept me on my toes and it was unlike "The Anubis Gates" is a terrific time travel fantasy. I really liked the challenge though, it kept me on my toes and it was unlike anything else I've ever read.

Aug 15, Jason Pettus rated it it was amazing Shelves: postmodernism , personal-favorite , alt-history , sci-fi , smart-nerdy , weird.

Genre fans will probably best know his "Fault Lines" trilogy from the s, a contemporary story about the "secret history" of magic in southern California; non-fans will probably be most familiar with a supernatural pirate novel he wrote in called On Stranger Tides , which twenty years later was adapted into the fourth "Pirates of the Caribbean" movie, to almost no one's satisfaction.

Although not his first-ever book that would be the traditional sci-fi tale The Skies Discrowned , which I'm reading next , the novel of his that I most recently took on was the first to get him a lot of attention, 's The Anubis Gates which won that year's Philip K.

Like many of his books, Anubis posits that there were a whole series of hidden supernatural things going on that explain the gaps in real history from various famous moments in time that we know of; here, for example, that the birth of Romanticism in the early s coincided with a group of Egypt-worshipping occultists who could do actual real magic, and that their unsuccessful attempt to bring back the pagan god Anubis from the dead resulted in ripping open a series of holes in the fabric of the space-time continuum.

Flash-forward to the early s, then, and we see that a Ted-Turner-type ailing billionaire has actually figured out a way to access these space-time holes, has sold a dozen private "time-traveling tickets" for millions of dollars to his rich friends to help fund his research, and has hired an academic expert on Samuel Taylor Coleridge to be essentially a "tour guide" for this group, who are traveling back to for a night to attend a lecture by this famous poet and opium addict.

Needless to say, things go to hell with this plan just as soon as they get there; and our historian hero Brendan Doyle finds himself permanently stuck in London, where he must learn to fend for himself while trying to track down a way to return to his own time, avoid the occult magicians who now know that a group from the future have traveled back to their time, and learn more about the hidden agenda that made this dying billionaire want to travel back to this specific moment in history in the first place.

Hint -- it has to do with the werewolf-like serial killer who happens to be haunting the back alleys of London's East End at this same time.

Like most of Powers' books, it's a mondo storyline that sometimes gets so weird and scattered that you can't possibly imagine how he's going to tie it all together by the end; but like most of Powers' books, he eventually does, with a kind of finesse and mastery over the three-act plot that makes most people an instant fan once they've read even a single book by him.

Powers paints a portrait of earlys London here that is so real and concrete-feeling, it seems sometimes like you have literally stepped back in time yourself; and by sticking to the real events and people of this time with the fastidiousness of an academe one of the other things his books are known for , he delivers not just a fantastical book but a historical one as well, one that looks at the actual things that were going on at that time and simply asks, "And what if a bunch of crazy supernatural things were also happening, at the moments that the historians weren't around to write about?

It'll be interesting at this point, I think, to jump back to the beginning of his career when he was writing much more straightforward genre tales; then after that, I think I'll jump forward to the "Fault Lines" books 's Last Call , 's Expiration Date and 's Earthquake Weather , and see him at what many consider the height of his power as a storyteller.

If you're never delved into the career of this fascinating writer yourself, I strongly encourage you to do so. Aug 30, thefourthvine rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Anyone who loves time travel stories the way fetishists love their kink porn.

Shelves: sff. Tim Powers is at his best with wacked-out time travel stories, and that's precisely what this is. He basically took the entire collection of English-language literary devices and tossed them into one book.

And then added some poetry. And some genderfuckery. And Ancient Egyptian myths and legends.

And, also, did I mention the time travel? A mild-mannered literature professor this is, um, something of a theme character in Powers' work goes back to the time of Lord Byron, and - look.

Things h Tim Powers is at his best with wacked-out time travel stories, and that's precisely what this is.

Things happen. I'm not going to spoil it. Suffice to say that this is the kind of book time travel fans read with joy and sorrow - joy because oh my god, so awesome , and sorrow because sooner or later the joy will be over.

The book isn't without flaws - Powers was still a fairly unseasoned writer when he produced this, and it shows.

But, seriously, whenever I re-read this, I'm having too much fun to care. Dec 28, SAM rated it did not like it Shelves: , garbage-shelf.

Next year I'll choose my books more wisely!!! Finally listened to it as a whole piece and not in odd mismatched parts from listening to it as I fall asleep.

An interesting thought experiment. A lover of history ends up thrown back in time and living in various parts of the past.

This is a complex story full of details that matter. In a way, you can't get distracted or zone out because you will definitely lose track of something important.

Powers did too good of a job of portraying the different character's feelings. It is done so well that you don't realize that you "feel" like that character while reading the story.

I had to spend more time with this book than I did a Malazan novel. May 13, Daniel Attack of the Books! Burton rated it it was amazing Shelves: hugo , science-fiction , fantasy.

But then, what should I have expected? As I think I saw someone else mention about the author, who else could combine Egyptian mythology, Lord Byron, quantum mechanics, sorcererous clowns, and time travel?

It is at times dark, other times indulgent, and occasionally syrupy with fantasy. It is, at all times, a complex mystery unfolding.

Brenden Doyle, an expert in the 19th century poet William Ashbless, is hired by a neurotic millionaire to provide the historical context for a lecture given by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Except the lecture is to be given in , and Doyle is to deliver his pre-lecture lecture to a team of time travelers who will attend meet Coleridge in person.

Everything goes according to plan, until Doyle finds himself stranded in London, penniless, pursued by murderous cultists of ancient Egyptian gods, and unmistakably out of place in time.

Powers has a fantastic knack for writing with the kind of abandon that makes important details look like afterthoughts or excess description.

It makes the opening chapters feel almost scattered and confusing, but provides later chapters with a solid foundation. This is all the more interesting in the read because the pieces that Powers lays out for his story come from so many different directions.

Using real events as a template for the events of his The Anubis Gates, he then strings them between them with the fantastic and creative.

The world he describes is alive, colorful and bright, helped along by vivid writing that adeptly adjusts language, accent, nomenclature, and description to match the geography and historicity of his settings.

Using history as his backdrop—especially times and places so disparate—does require some leaps, though, and as the pages pass, there were moments when I wondered if Powers would get to the point, whether he would be able to tie up all of the loose ends.

So much time had been spent laying the ground work, and now the leap was going to be dramatic to pick up the pacing.

He wastes no time in satisfying his reader, meeting expectations, and answering questions. Shelves: reviewed , historical-fiction , fiction , readbooks-male-author-or-illust , speculative-fiction , z , zz-3star , novel , groups-buddies.

This book was exhausting to read. It has an extremely convoluted plot and I had to concentrate carefully to avoid feeling confused.

I suppose it earns 4 stars or even 5 for the author managing to put it all together at the end, and that was quite a feat, but my experience of reading it was just that I liked it, nothing more.

I think that too much happened and that there was too much This book was exhausting to read. I think that too much happened and that there was too much action.

The prologue was really hard for me to get through but once I got to the rest of the book I found it interesting. I appreciated the historical fiction, especially the inclusion of some romantic poets.

I liked the humor, especially one extended part toward the end. It was all a tad too dark for me. View all 19 comments. This is an extremely jolly time-travelling, swash-buckling adventure!

I'm surprised though that it won a science fiction award, as it's clearly fantasy. The time travel here is powered by Egyptian wizards, with no time wasted on specious physics.

Thoroughly recommended for anyone looking for a boys-own adventure: there's plenty of sword-fights, monsters, wizards, evil beggar-kings, revolutions, creepy clowns, and even cameos from great poets like Byron and Coleridge.

Oct 19, Sandy rated it it was amazing. Tim Powers' fourth novel, 's "The Anubis Gates," is a book that I had been meaning to read for years.

Dick Memorial Award in , the book came with plenty of good word of mouth, to say the least. And, as it turns out, all the ballyhoo back when was fully justified, as this really IS some kind of superb work.

In the novel, we meet a middle-aged widower named Brendan Doyle, an expert on Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the fictional poet William Ashbless.

Doyle is asked by an eccentric millionaire who has come up with a time travel device to journey back to London in the year , to attend a Coleridge lecture with a group of wealthy chrono tourists.

Doyle warily agrees and--to make things brief--gets marooned in the past, where he soon becomes enmeshed in the machinations of Egyptian wizards attempting to destroy England.

Powers' way-out plot somehow manages to conflate the brainwashed "ka" of Lord Byron, a body-hopping werewolf, an underground criminal society headed by a deformed clown on stilts, a plucky young vengeance-seeking woman disguised as a man, Egyptian gods, 4" high "Spoonsize Boys," fire and wind elementals, the Mameluke slaughter of , a menagerie of freaks, the Beatles!

And just when the reader thinks this plot could not possibly get any wilder, Powers catapults Doyle back even further, to the year !

Indeed, there is no way for anyone to possibly guess what is coming next, in this truly zany romp of a book. Remarkably, every single page of this nearly page affair boasts some startling conversation, plot twist, description or speculation.

Powers has done a huge amount of historical research, and his book always has the ring of verisimilitude, despite the outrageousness of the plot.

An originator not only of the so-called "steampunk" literary genre but also of the "secret histories" style of writing, Powers, in this book, puts forth his amusing explanations for London's Great Fire of , as well as Byron's apparently simultaneous presences in Greece and London in the autumn of And although stories with time travel paradoxes can sometimes leave me with a headache, I found this one absolutely delightful.

Let me not mince words: This book is a blast, from its opening scene in a London gypsy camp in to its wonderful, ironic, totally satisfying conclusion in the swamps of Woolwich.

Clute was right; I really DO love this book, and indeed am in awe of it. So many wild elements mixed together, such an original and imaginative story line, and the whole thing coming together so completely and perfectly Tim Powers must be some kind of a freakin' genius!

I would like to add that "The Anubis Gates" is not an easy read for folks who like me choose to look up every historical reference or place name that they encounter.

I found a London street map invaluable while reading this book, for example; it's not necessary, of course, but sure does make for a richer, deeper experience.

Thus, I was able to spot one of two flubs that Powers is guilty of in his otherwise perfect work. At one point, he tells us that Coleman Street is east of Bishopsgate Street, whereas a quick look at the map will clearly show that it is west.

Powers' other goof? When he infers on page that Doyle would be attending a literary meeting at the home of renowned publisher John Murray on a Tuesday, and two pages later says it would be on a Monday.

I also find it hard to believe that the word "savvy" was being used in Mere quibbles, of course. It is a very generous book, far more intelligent and humorous than it absolutely needs to be, and well deserving of all the accolades that it has received.

Ladies and gentlemen, this was the last book I read before I go on vacation and do a forced break at Easter who joined the day of Villalar.

The story of this book was involved the hand of a great lady to whom I promised to read "the gates of Anubis" then with my bad experience with "On stranger Tides" one of the books that I have most displeased read.

This one thing was mixed, and is that the pirates have never liked. In the Hispanic character is always hate the pirate at least in my case.

With all Tim Powers is a writer human ever since the plane has fallen me well, and you have always had sympathy, even when I was a kid and went to the bookstore Petrarch when he was in La Salle there bought me the books of Dragonlance Heroes , but I never dared to buy his books.

As I said in my review of "Space Chantey" of R. My friend Kunnio would call him filia, and instinctive phobias. I've got I like R.

I love. I share that passion with the writer Charles E. It is also true, that I am very conservative, also in the realm of fantasy, and may not be ready for a style such as the Steampunk Tim Powers practice.

I welcome very much the theme of an Egyptian secret order, which is destroy England. Reminded me of that wonderful movie of Barry Levinson The Young Sherlock Holmes, where a group of worshippers of the ancient gods of Egypt are engaged in abducting damsels, and sacrifice them, amen to kill a group of archaeologists who were there.

Also I liked the contribution's to the subject of alternative universes, and even a skeptic. I believe in the Fermi paradox I am very sceptical with respect to travel in time, but I love to read stories about them.

Anyway, the author of the foreword of the work "The gates of Anubis" which has edited Gigamesh has done him a disservice. It is there to sell and promote the work of the author that you edit, but say that this is the best novel of travel time, and say that history comes to life as opposed to some historical novels, which are decorated cigar.

Fake it's a folly. First, because there is an author who has written better novels of travel at the time as Tim Powers, is called Poul Anderson, and as I say I, like historian this if can be sold as a writer of historical novels.

I think that it would have been him having wanted it. But Time Patrol is the best novel of travel at the time, that has been written. At least for my taste.

It was also a success the choice of villains Dr. Romanelli, and make another trip in time to England in the 17TH century by the way, that part is slightly Catholic because the Egyptian brotherhood is self-confident with the Protestants.

There is a real England, and another magic in which governs the Raven King. But I will not say anything, to not pop the argument to no one, and above all the best thing about this novel is the blow to determinism, and that our future not this writing.

It is very well have gotten a writer of fiction as William Ashblee. But the novel is more rare than a green dog, and some scenes they hit so much as a Saint two pistols.

Too modern for my taste. Between the Kaa, the machinations of the evil millionaire with cancer, and Amenofis Fikke, which shifts body rather than Dragon Ball of am had to show my Otaku side It is a real mess with so much change of body, I did not know who was who.

Or where were the characters. Some scenes will until found me unpleasant. Not to mention the Egyptian part, I think, which is the worst novel.

In fact, many of the subplots come not to tell, and unnecessarily lengthen this novel Therefore initially had suspended her, because he thought that Powers in her next novel because this will not be the last book, which read that insurance would do it much better.

But Gene Wolfe, that I never got to understand, and told me that it had to approve this novel, because it's Christmas, as I said in La Salle died 2.

That yes the musical taste of the unfortunate protagonist. It is that to sing the Beatles. The s are not my favorites only demons they like, they ask it to Azazel in the film fail.

That, I hope, whoever reads this criticism like you more than me. That, it will return to meet Mr Powers in the future, or the past En resumen con Tim Powers me pasa lo mismo que a J.

He conseguido que me guste R. No consigo que me guste del todo. Me agrado mucho el tema de una orden secreta egipcia, que trata de destruir Inglaterra.

A parte de falso es una sandez. Pero Time Patrol es la mejor novela de viajes en el tiempo, que se ha escrito.

Al menos para mi gusto. Demasiado vanguardista para mi gusto. Algunas escenas hasta me parecieron desagradables. Por no hablar de la parte egipcia, que creo, que es lo peor de la novela.

De hecho, muchas de las subtramas no vienen a cuento, y alargan esta novela innecesariamente.

Que es eso de ponerse a cantar a los Beatles. May 26, Kim rated it liked it. This was a tough one for me. Once I hit that mark, I was fine.

I felt the story was entertaining. Clever, even. I particularly enjoyed the Coleridge and Byron characters.

Eventually, I warmed up to the main protagonist, Brendan Doyle, even though I had a hard time t This was a tough one for me.

Eventually, I warmed up to the main protagonist, Brendan Doyle, even though I had a hard time truly buying into the idea that a 20th century biographer of poets could be such a swash-buckling hero in the 17th and 19th centuries.

I felt that there was little there to make me believe he could triumph over such odds. As always reading this books is a sheer joy and I will be honest the more I can convert to it the better.

The book is sheer fantasy set up to a back drop of historical events and framed with science fiction. Once you have negotiated that you are in for a roller coaster ride you really have no idea where it will take you.

One thing I will say is that even though the book takes time and I will admit that finding the story suddenly being divided in to books surprised me the story seems to shift ge As always reading this books is a sheer joy and I will be honest the more I can convert to it the better.

One thing I will say is that even though the book takes time and I will admit that finding the story suddenly being divided in to books surprised me the story seems to shift gear and really pick up speed.

For me there are so many cultural references there and if the urban legend is true certain characters have inspired other authors to create some of their most memorable and famous characters go on and see if you can find who I mean.

This book was an award winner and although over the years some books loose the edge that won them that accolade this book I feel is as fresh as the day I first read it.

Readers also enjoyed. Science Fiction. About Tim Powers. Tim Powers. Timothy Thomas Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy author.

Most of Powers's novels are "secret histories" : he uses actual, documented historical events featuring famous people, but shows another view of them in which occult or supernatural factors heavily influence the motivations a Timothy Thomas Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy author.

Most of Powers's novels are "secret histories" : he uses actual, documented historical events featuring famous people, but shows another view of them in which occult or supernatural factors heavily influence the motivations and actions of the characters.

Jeter , both of whom remained close friends and occasional collaborators; the trio have half-seriously referred to themselves as "steampunks" in contrast to the prevailing cyberpunk genre of the s.

Another friend Powers first met during this period was noted science fiction writer Philip K. Blade Runner is dedicated to him.

Dick Award, and has since been published in many other languages. Powers and his wife, Serena, currently live in Muscoy, California.

He also taught part time at the University of Redlands. Excerpted from Wikipedia. Books by Tim Powers. We're halfway through the year that time forgot!

I mean, Believe it or not, it's June. Traditionally, this is when the Goodr Read more Trivia About The Anubis Gates. Quotes from The Anubis Gates.

Faith, he tells us, is not an exotic bloom to be laboriously maintained by the exclusion of most aspects of the day to day world, nor a useful delusion to be supported by sophistries and half-truths like a child's belief in Father Christmas - not, in short, a prudently unregarded adherence to a constructed creed; but rather must be, if anything, a clear-eyed recognition of the patterns and tendencies, to be found in every piece of the world's fabric, which are the lineaments of God.

This is why religion can only be advice and clarification, and cannot carry any spurs of enforcement - for only belief and behavior that is independently arrived at, and then chosen, can be praised or blamed.

This being the case, it can be seen as a criminal abridgement of a person's rights willfully to keep him in ignorance of any facts - no piece can be judged inadmissible, for the more stones, both bright and dark, that are added to the mosaic, the clearer is our picture of God.

Then away they floats in their eggshell boats, down the drains to their underground world. Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account.

The Challenge Fac Misters Broken Wings. It also marked the band's 10 years anniversary as a recording artist. Anubis Gate was engaged to perform their first US gig on September 11, at the Prog Power Festival in Atlanta, but had to cancel due to health problems within the band.

In September , the band released a limited box set called Orbits , containing the long out of print first four albums plus a double rarities bonus disc.

This box set was funded via fans on Kickstarter in April Their seventh album Covered In Black was released September 1, The album was darker and more dissonant than usual inspired by the same health problems that cancelled Prog power Videos were shot for The Combat and Black , and the album was generally well received, although some were put off slightly by the darker mood.

Next up was a bit different from the pack. Apparently the band needed a break from writing after the dark Covered In Black and came up with the idea to do a cover album.

The idea of covering others material is not strange to the band, as every recording session since has contained at least one cover song all of which are available on the Orbits box set.

As a counterweight to its predecessor the album was aptly named Covered In Colours , containing tracks that the members were greatly inspired by in their youth, careers and by contemporaries.

The album was produced and mixed by Kim Olesen and released April 24, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about progressive metal band.

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Anubis Gate

As a counterweight to its predecessor the album was aptly named Covered In Colours , containing tracks that the members were greatly inspired by in their youth, careers and by contemporaries.

The album was produced and mixed by Kim Olesen and released April 24, From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. This article is about progressive metal band.

This article has multiple issues. Please help improve it or discuss these issues on the talk page. Learn how and when to remove these template messages.

This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed.

This article relies too much on references to primary sources. Please improve this by adding secondary or tertiary sources.

December Learn how and when to remove this template message. This section needs expansion. You can help by adding to it.

April Retrieved Authority control MusicBrainz : 98defae0b-b8dfc. Categories : Danish musical groups Locomotive Music artists Musical quartets.

Hidden categories: Pages using Timeline Articles needing additional references from October All articles needing additional references Articles lacking reliable references from December All articles lacking reliable references Articles with multiple maintenance issues Articles with hCards Articles to be expanded from April All articles to be expanded Articles using small message boxes Wikipedia articles with MusicBrainz identifiers.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. The book isn't without flaws - Powers was still a fairly unseasoned writer when he produced this, and it shows.

But, seriously, whenever I re-read this, I'm having too much fun to care. Dec 28, SAM rated it did not like it Shelves: , garbage-shelf.

Next year I'll choose my books more wisely!!! Finally listened to it as a whole piece and not in odd mismatched parts from listening to it as I fall asleep.

An interesting thought experiment. A lover of history ends up thrown back in time and living in various parts of the past.

This is a complex story full of details that matter. In a way, you can't get distracted or zone out because you will definitely lose track of something important.

Powers did too good of a job of portraying the different character's feelings. It is done so well that you don't realize that you "feel" like that character while reading the story.

I had to spend more time with this book than I did a Malazan novel. May 13, Daniel Attack of the Books! Burton rated it it was amazing Shelves: hugo , science-fiction , fantasy.

But then, what should I have expected? As I think I saw someone else mention about the author, who else could combine Egyptian mythology, Lord Byron, quantum mechanics, sorcererous clowns, and time travel?

It is at times dark, other times indulgent, and occasionally syrupy with fantasy. It is, at all times, a complex mystery unfolding.

Brenden Doyle, an expert in the 19th century poet William Ashbless, is hired by a neurotic millionaire to provide the historical context for a lecture given by Samuel Taylor Coleridge.

Except the lecture is to be given in , and Doyle is to deliver his pre-lecture lecture to a team of time travelers who will attend meet Coleridge in person.

Everything goes according to plan, until Doyle finds himself stranded in London, penniless, pursued by murderous cultists of ancient Egyptian gods, and unmistakably out of place in time.

Powers has a fantastic knack for writing with the kind of abandon that makes important details look like afterthoughts or excess description.

It makes the opening chapters feel almost scattered and confusing, but provides later chapters with a solid foundation. This is all the more interesting in the read because the pieces that Powers lays out for his story come from so many different directions.

Using real events as a template for the events of his The Anubis Gates, he then strings them between them with the fantastic and creative.

The world he describes is alive, colorful and bright, helped along by vivid writing that adeptly adjusts language, accent, nomenclature, and description to match the geography and historicity of his settings.

Using history as his backdrop—especially times and places so disparate—does require some leaps, though, and as the pages pass, there were moments when I wondered if Powers would get to the point, whether he would be able to tie up all of the loose ends.

So much time had been spent laying the ground work, and now the leap was going to be dramatic to pick up the pacing.

He wastes no time in satisfying his reader, meeting expectations, and answering questions. Shelves: reviewed , historical-fiction , fiction , readbooks-male-author-or-illust , speculative-fiction , z , zz-3star , novel , groups-buddies.

This book was exhausting to read. It has an extremely convoluted plot and I had to concentrate carefully to avoid feeling confused.

I suppose it earns 4 stars or even 5 for the author managing to put it all together at the end, and that was quite a feat, but my experience of reading it was just that I liked it, nothing more.

I think that too much happened and that there was too much This book was exhausting to read. I think that too much happened and that there was too much action.

The prologue was really hard for me to get through but once I got to the rest of the book I found it interesting. I appreciated the historical fiction, especially the inclusion of some romantic poets.

I liked the humor, especially one extended part toward the end. It was all a tad too dark for me. View all 19 comments. This is an extremely jolly time-travelling, swash-buckling adventure!

I'm surprised though that it won a science fiction award, as it's clearly fantasy. The time travel here is powered by Egyptian wizards, with no time wasted on specious physics.

Thoroughly recommended for anyone looking for a boys-own adventure: there's plenty of sword-fights, monsters, wizards, evil beggar-kings, revolutions, creepy clowns, and even cameos from great poets like Byron and Coleridge.

Oct 19, Sandy rated it it was amazing. Tim Powers' fourth novel, 's "The Anubis Gates," is a book that I had been meaning to read for years.

Dick Memorial Award in , the book came with plenty of good word of mouth, to say the least. And, as it turns out, all the ballyhoo back when was fully justified, as this really IS some kind of superb work.

In the novel, we meet a middle-aged widower named Brendan Doyle, an expert on Samuel Taylor Coleridge and the fictional poet William Ashbless.

Doyle is asked by an eccentric millionaire who has come up with a time travel device to journey back to London in the year , to attend a Coleridge lecture with a group of wealthy chrono tourists.

Doyle warily agrees and--to make things brief--gets marooned in the past, where he soon becomes enmeshed in the machinations of Egyptian wizards attempting to destroy England.

Powers' way-out plot somehow manages to conflate the brainwashed "ka" of Lord Byron, a body-hopping werewolf, an underground criminal society headed by a deformed clown on stilts, a plucky young vengeance-seeking woman disguised as a man, Egyptian gods, 4" high "Spoonsize Boys," fire and wind elementals, the Mameluke slaughter of , a menagerie of freaks, the Beatles!

And just when the reader thinks this plot could not possibly get any wilder, Powers catapults Doyle back even further, to the year ! Indeed, there is no way for anyone to possibly guess what is coming next, in this truly zany romp of a book.

Remarkably, every single page of this nearly page affair boasts some startling conversation, plot twist, description or speculation.

Powers has done a huge amount of historical research, and his book always has the ring of verisimilitude, despite the outrageousness of the plot.

An originator not only of the so-called "steampunk" literary genre but also of the "secret histories" style of writing, Powers, in this book, puts forth his amusing explanations for London's Great Fire of , as well as Byron's apparently simultaneous presences in Greece and London in the autumn of And although stories with time travel paradoxes can sometimes leave me with a headache, I found this one absolutely delightful.

Let me not mince words: This book is a blast, from its opening scene in a London gypsy camp in to its wonderful, ironic, totally satisfying conclusion in the swamps of Woolwich.

Clute was right; I really DO love this book, and indeed am in awe of it. So many wild elements mixed together, such an original and imaginative story line, and the whole thing coming together so completely and perfectly Tim Powers must be some kind of a freakin' genius!

I would like to add that "The Anubis Gates" is not an easy read for folks who like me choose to look up every historical reference or place name that they encounter.

I found a London street map invaluable while reading this book, for example; it's not necessary, of course, but sure does make for a richer, deeper experience.

Thus, I was able to spot one of two flubs that Powers is guilty of in his otherwise perfect work. At one point, he tells us that Coleman Street is east of Bishopsgate Street, whereas a quick look at the map will clearly show that it is west.

Powers' other goof? When he infers on page that Doyle would be attending a literary meeting at the home of renowned publisher John Murray on a Tuesday, and two pages later says it would be on a Monday.

I also find it hard to believe that the word "savvy" was being used in Mere quibbles, of course. It is a very generous book, far more intelligent and humorous than it absolutely needs to be, and well deserving of all the accolades that it has received.

Ladies and gentlemen, this was the last book I read before I go on vacation and do a forced break at Easter who joined the day of Villalar.

The story of this book was involved the hand of a great lady to whom I promised to read "the gates of Anubis" then with my bad experience with "On stranger Tides" one of the books that I have most displeased read.

This one thing was mixed, and is that the pirates have never liked. In the Hispanic character is always hate the pirate at least in my case.

With all Tim Powers is a writer human ever since the plane has fallen me well, and you have always had sympathy, even when I was a kid and went to the bookstore Petrarch when he was in La Salle there bought me the books of Dragonlance Heroes , but I never dared to buy his books.

As I said in my review of "Space Chantey" of R. My friend Kunnio would call him filia, and instinctive phobias. I've got I like R. I love.

I share that passion with the writer Charles E. It is also true, that I am very conservative, also in the realm of fantasy, and may not be ready for a style such as the Steampunk Tim Powers practice.

I welcome very much the theme of an Egyptian secret order, which is destroy England. Reminded me of that wonderful movie of Barry Levinson The Young Sherlock Holmes, where a group of worshippers of the ancient gods of Egypt are engaged in abducting damsels, and sacrifice them, amen to kill a group of archaeologists who were there.

Also I liked the contribution's to the subject of alternative universes, and even a skeptic. I believe in the Fermi paradox I am very sceptical with respect to travel in time, but I love to read stories about them.

Anyway, the author of the foreword of the work "The gates of Anubis" which has edited Gigamesh has done him a disservice.

It is there to sell and promote the work of the author that you edit, but say that this is the best novel of travel time, and say that history comes to life as opposed to some historical novels, which are decorated cigar.

Fake it's a folly. First, because there is an author who has written better novels of travel at the time as Tim Powers, is called Poul Anderson, and as I say I, like historian this if can be sold as a writer of historical novels.

I think that it would have been him having wanted it. But Time Patrol is the best novel of travel at the time, that has been written.

At least for my taste. It was also a success the choice of villains Dr. Romanelli, and make another trip in time to England in the 17TH century by the way, that part is slightly Catholic because the Egyptian brotherhood is self-confident with the Protestants.

There is a real England, and another magic in which governs the Raven King. But I will not say anything, to not pop the argument to no one, and above all the best thing about this novel is the blow to determinism, and that our future not this writing.

It is very well have gotten a writer of fiction as William Ashblee. But the novel is more rare than a green dog, and some scenes they hit so much as a Saint two pistols.

Too modern for my taste. Between the Kaa, the machinations of the evil millionaire with cancer, and Amenofis Fikke, which shifts body rather than Dragon Ball of am had to show my Otaku side It is a real mess with so much change of body, I did not know who was who.

Or where were the characters. Some scenes will until found me unpleasant. Not to mention the Egyptian part, I think, which is the worst novel.

In fact, many of the subplots come not to tell, and unnecessarily lengthen this novel Therefore initially had suspended her, because he thought that Powers in her next novel because this will not be the last book, which read that insurance would do it much better.

But Gene Wolfe, that I never got to understand, and told me that it had to approve this novel, because it's Christmas, as I said in La Salle died 2.

That yes the musical taste of the unfortunate protagonist. It is that to sing the Beatles. The s are not my favorites only demons they like, they ask it to Azazel in the film fail.

That, I hope, whoever reads this criticism like you more than me. That, it will return to meet Mr Powers in the future, or the past En resumen con Tim Powers me pasa lo mismo que a J.

He conseguido que me guste R. No consigo que me guste del todo. Me agrado mucho el tema de una orden secreta egipcia, que trata de destruir Inglaterra.

A parte de falso es una sandez. Pero Time Patrol es la mejor novela de viajes en el tiempo, que se ha escrito.

Al menos para mi gusto. Demasiado vanguardista para mi gusto. Algunas escenas hasta me parecieron desagradables.

Por no hablar de la parte egipcia, que creo, que es lo peor de la novela. De hecho, muchas de las subtramas no vienen a cuento, y alargan esta novela innecesariamente.

Que es eso de ponerse a cantar a los Beatles. May 26, Kim rated it liked it. This was a tough one for me.

Once I hit that mark, I was fine. I felt the story was entertaining. Clever, even. I particularly enjoyed the Coleridge and Byron characters.

Eventually, I warmed up to the main protagonist, Brendan Doyle, even though I had a hard time t This was a tough one for me.

Eventually, I warmed up to the main protagonist, Brendan Doyle, even though I had a hard time truly buying into the idea that a 20th century biographer of poets could be such a swash-buckling hero in the 17th and 19th centuries.

I felt that there was little there to make me believe he could triumph over such odds. As always reading this books is a sheer joy and I will be honest the more I can convert to it the better.

The book is sheer fantasy set up to a back drop of historical events and framed with science fiction. Once you have negotiated that you are in for a roller coaster ride you really have no idea where it will take you.

One thing I will say is that even though the book takes time and I will admit that finding the story suddenly being divided in to books surprised me the story seems to shift ge As always reading this books is a sheer joy and I will be honest the more I can convert to it the better.

One thing I will say is that even though the book takes time and I will admit that finding the story suddenly being divided in to books surprised me the story seems to shift gear and really pick up speed.

For me there are so many cultural references there and if the urban legend is true certain characters have inspired other authors to create some of their most memorable and famous characters go on and see if you can find who I mean.

This book was an award winner and although over the years some books loose the edge that won them that accolade this book I feel is as fresh as the day I first read it.

Readers also enjoyed. Science Fiction. About Tim Powers. Tim Powers. Timothy Thomas Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy author.

Most of Powers's novels are "secret histories" : he uses actual, documented historical events featuring famous people, but shows another view of them in which occult or supernatural factors heavily influence the motivations a Timothy Thomas Powers is an American science fiction and fantasy author.

Most of Powers's novels are "secret histories" : he uses actual, documented historical events featuring famous people, but shows another view of them in which occult or supernatural factors heavily influence the motivations and actions of the characters.

Jeter , both of whom remained close friends and occasional collaborators; the trio have half-seriously referred to themselves as "steampunks" in contrast to the prevailing cyberpunk genre of the s.

Another friend Powers first met during this period was noted science fiction writer Philip K. Blade Runner is dedicated to him.

Dick Award, and has since been published in many other languages. Powers and his wife, Serena, currently live in Muscoy, California.

He also taught part time at the University of Redlands. Excerpted from Wikipedia. Books by Tim Powers. We're halfway through the year that time forgot!

I mean, A novel that transcends genre limitations, this book will please lovers of all fiction alike. Cochrane Darrow and Dr.

It has been conjectured that the character Horrabin might have provided inspiration for Stephen King 's clown, Pennywise, which also inhabited sewers, in the novel It.

Javier Olivares has stated that the novel was one of the main inspirations for the Spanish television show El Ministerio del Tiempo , which he co-created.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Fantasy novel by Tim Powers. Novels portal. Worlds Without End. Retrieved Argent Leaf Press.

Internet Speculative Fiction Database. Retrieved March 28, Flashlight Worthy. TSR 80 : Steven Wu's Book Reviews. Archived from the original on May 13, Revolution SF.

Far Sector. Retrieved 15 May Retrieved 26 Feb The Empire of Glass. Virgin Publishing. Hidden categories: Articles with short description.

Namespaces Article Talk. Views Read Edit View history. Help Community portal Recent changes Upload file.

Download as PDF Printable version. Cover of first edition paperback.

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